Saturday, October 21, 2017
   
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OCTOBER IS BREAST CANCER AWARENESS MONTH

Breast Cancer Awareness

 

Photo of a woman talking to her doctor

Learn how to lower your breast cancer risk and get resources to share from CDC!

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Other than skin cancer, breast cancer(https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast/) is the most common cancer among American women. Getting mammograms(https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast/basic_info/mammograms.htm) regularly can lower the risk of dying from breast cancer. The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends that if you are 50 to 74 years old, be sure to have a screening mammogram every two years. If you are 40 to 49 years old, talk to your doctor about when to start and how often to get a screening mammogram.

Are you worried about the cost? CDC offers free or low-cost mammograms. Find out if you qualify.(https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/nbccedp/screenings.htm)

What Are the Symptoms?

There are different symptoms of breast cancer,(https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast/basic_info/symptoms.htm) and some people have no symptoms at all. Symptoms can include any change in the size or the shape of the breast, pain in any area of the breast, nipple discharge other than breast milk (including blood), and a new lump in the breast or underarm. If you have any signs that worry you, see your doctor right away.

How Can I Lower My Risk?

Some main factors that influence your risk for breast cancer(https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast/basic_info/risk_factors.htm) include being a woman, being older (most breast cancers are found in women who are 50 years old or older), and having changes in your breast cancer genes (BRCA1 and BRCA2).(https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast/young_women/bringyourbrave/hereditary_breast_cancer/brca_gene_mutations.htm) Most women who get breast cancer have no known risk factors and no history of the disease in their families. There are things you can do to can help lower your breast cancer risk.(https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast/basic_info/prevention.htm) The Know:BRCA tool(https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast/young_women/knowbrca.htm) can help you assess your risk of having changes in your BRCA genes.

Although breast cancer screening(https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast/basic_info/screening.htm) cannot prevent breast cancer, it can help find breast cancer early, when it is easier to treat. Talk to your doctor about which breast cancer screening tests are right for you, and when you should have them.

Bring Your Brave campaign logo

CDC’s Bring Your Brave campaign(https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast/young_women/bringyourbrave/) provides information about breast cancer to women younger than age 45 by sharing real stories about young women whose lives have been affected by breast cancer.

Fast Facts About Breast Cancer

  • Each year in the United States, more than 200,000 women get breast cancer and more than 40,000 women die from the disease.
  • Men also get breast cancer, but it is not very common. Less than 1% of breast cancers occur in men.
  • Most breast cancers are found in women who are 50 years old or older, but breast cancer also affects younger women.(https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast/young_women/bringyourbrave/breast_cancer_young_women/) About 10% of all new cases of breast cancer in the United States are found in women younger than 45 years of age.

 

IRON COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT FLU CLINIC SCHEDULE 2017

 

Oct. 25   10:30 – 11:30  Springstead Town Hall

 

Oct. 26     8:30 – 11:30  Iron County Health Dept


If you can not make these clinics you can schedule an appointment

by calling the Health Department at 715-561-2191.

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Information for 2017-2018

Getting an annual flu vaccine is the first and best way to protect yourself and your family from the flu. Flu vaccination can reduce flu illnesses, doctors’ visits, and missed work and school due to flu, as well as prevent flu-related hospitalizations. The more people who get vaccinated, the more people will be protected from flu, including older people, very young children, pregnant women and people with certain health conditions who are more vulnerable to serious flu complications. This page summarizes information for the 2017-2018 flu season.

What viruses will the 2017-2018 flu vaccines protect against?

There are many flu viruses and they are constantly changing. The composition of U.S. flu vaccines is reviewed annually and updated to match circulating flu viruses. Flu vaccines protect against the three or four viruses that research suggests will be most common. For 2017-2018, three-component vaccines are recommended to contain:

  • an A/Michigan/45/2015 (H1N1)pdm09-like virus
  • an A/Hong Kong/4801/2014 (H3N2)-like virus
  • a B/Brisbane/60/2008-like (B/Victoria lineage) virus

Four-component vaccines, which protect against a second lineage of B viruses, are recommended to be produced using the same viruses recommended for the trivalent vaccines, as well as a B/Phuket/3073/2013-like (B/Yamagata lineage) virus.

Information on Flu shots(when available) and Location will be announced in local Newspapers and radio stations.

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Family smiling outdoors

Immunization, or vaccination, helps prevent dangerous and sometimes deadly diseases. Immunization isn’t just for kids — to stay protected against serious illnesses like the flu, measles, and pneumonia, adults need to get vaccinated too.

National Immunization Awareness Month is a great time to promote vaccines and remind family, friends, and coworkers to stay up to date on their shots.

How can National Immunization Awareness Month make a difference?

We can all use this month to raise awareness about vaccines and share strategies to increase immunization rates with our community.

Here are just a few ideas:

 

  • Talk to friends and family members about how vaccines aren’t just for kids. People of all ages can get shots to protect them from serious diseases.
  • Encourage people in your community to get the flu vaccine every year.
  • Invite a doctor or nurse to speak to parents about why it’s important for all kids to get vaccinated.

How can I help spread the word?

 

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DHS. WISCONSIN.GOV

FACT SHEET ON OUR NEW WEBSITE

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services has upgraded our website to better serve Wisconsin citizens. Our agency meets many different needs-but as a whole we are here to protect and promote the health and safety of the people of Wisconsin. A modern, well‐designed, and more responsive website will help us to achieve that.

We are using a web development tool called Drupal that has been adopted widely across both business and government. Drupal is an open source web content management system with an active development community. In other words, it is a free tool for building websites that has caught on as a practical and innovative solution worldwide.

The user experience is extremely important to us, and this upgrade has allowed us to greatly improve it.

**We studied how people navigate and why they come to   the website-and applied what we learned. Overall, visitors to our website should find it less complicated to browse, search, and find what they want.

**We are also using best practices for design. The new look is uncluttered and easier on the user's eyes.

**Our website is now optimized for mobile, which means you can view our site on any device with ease.

**We continue our ongoing agency commitment to accessibility and compliance with federal regulation, sec

 

Our Mission

The Iron County Wisconsin Health Department is here to serve the residents of Iron County Wisconsin by promoting health, protecting the enviroment, and preventing disease and injury.

 

 

 

 

Office Information

Department Head: Katie Hampston, BSN, RN
Address:
502 Copper Street
Suite 2
Hurley, WI 54534
Phone: 715-561-2191
Toll Free: 888-561-2191
Fax: 715-561-2836
Office Hours: 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM
   

Latest Events

Wed Oct 25 @10:30AM - 11:30AM
FLU CLINIC Springstead
Thu Oct 26 @08:30AM - 11:30AM
FLU CLINIC Iron County Health Dept.